How to interpret these coordinates?

Discussion in 'General GPS Discussion' started by oodly, Oct 15, 2019.

  1. oodly

    oodly

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    I have an old map of Washington state that has latitude and longitude notations that appear to define lines, not points of location. One example is a line that has N.07º33'30"E. hand written on it. I've tried googling this type of notation but haven't found much. Can someone shed some light on how to interpret this type of coordinates?
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2019
    oodly, Oct 15, 2019
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  2. oodly

    Nuvi-Nebie Moderator

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    As you say, the digits provided could only make up a single Latitude or Longitude line, so having both a 'N' for North AND 'E' for East doesn't make much sense, Washington State is roughly 45 to 48 degrees North and 116 to 124 Degrees West, so the only way I can see of getting a line on your Washington State map would be to have a 40 Degree North offset so that N.07º33'30"E. would be N.47º33'30", this would place a horizontal (Latitude) line though Peshastin, but it is a bit of a long shot to add the '4' and remove the 'E'

    Is the line on your map vertical, horizontal, of maybe at an angle of 7.5 degrees from vertical / horizontal?, if it is the last one, maybe the numbers refer to direction 7.5 Degress from North towards the East
     
    Nuvi-Nebie, Oct 15, 2019
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  3. oodly

    oodly

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    You're on to something. The line that bears N.07º33'30"E. looks like a possible ~7º offset from a longitude line, almost vertical. Looking at the map, the line goes through the north part of the Puget Sound and the top of the Hood Canal.
     
    oodly, Oct 15, 2019
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