Highest ground speed could be measured by typical GPS modules

Discussion in 'General GPS Discussion' started by Nima.mgh, Apr 10, 2021.

  1. Nima.mgh

    Nima.mgh

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    Hi Dears,

    I've got a simple question but it seems it's a good challenge to get right answer for that.

    How can we calculate the highest possible ground-speed which could be recorded by typical GPS modules such as Ublox Neo-7?
    Which parameters of GPS modules will be related to this calculation?

    Any Help Appreciated

    Regards,
    Nima
     
    Nima.mgh, Apr 10, 2021
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  2. Nima.mgh

    Nuvi-Nebie Moderator

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    Theoretically I don't think there is a limit to the maximum speed a GPS module can record speed, the unit will calculate a position and after a period of time it will calculate a new positon, it can then calculate the distance between the two locations, let us say they are 50 metres apart, if the time between measurements was 1 second then the speed is 0.05 kilometres per second or 180 kilometres per hour

    Manufactures sometimes limit the maximum speed a unit will record, for example Garmin used to limit their early hand held units to 99 MPH, but this wasn't because the unit stopped working beyond 99MPH, it was because they didn't want their cheaper units used in aeroplanes, this meant customers had to buy their more expensive aviation GPS units

    There is provision in the NMEA sentences for 999.9 Knots (per hour) e.g. :-
    $GPVTG,054.7,T,034.4,M,999.9,N,010.2,K

    This is equivalent to 1150.6 MPH or 1851.8 KMH
     
    Nuvi-Nebie, Apr 11, 2021
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  3. Nima.mgh

    Mark Hunter

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    Don't forget the the COCOM limits, Google says (top hit):

    In GPS technology, the term "COCOM Limits" also refers to a limit placed on GPS tracking devices that disables tracking when the device calculates that it is moving faster than 1,000 knots (1,900 km/h; 1,200 mph) at an altitude higher than 18,000 m (59,000 ft).
     
    Mark Hunter, Apr 19, 2021
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  4. Nima.mgh

    Mark Hunter

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    Don't forget that solving the GPS equations automatically also gives velocity for each epoch (PVT)
     
    Mark Hunter, Apr 19, 2021
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